Is cancer incidence increasing?

I met Roopa the other day and she asked me, “Doc, every friend or relative seems to be having cancer. Why? Is cancer incidence increasing?”

I am asked this question very frequently and I keep giving same answers to explain ( not convincingly ) the increasing numbers. With increasing longevity of life there is likely to be more cancer & non-communicable diseases. Life styles have changed and may contribute.

I recently went to the Indian Cancer Society Meeting on the Cancer Registry Project.   The Mumbai Cancer Registry records only residents of Mumbai and not migrant population and has plotted the incidence over the last three decades. Great work and a tough one too!

Breast and Lung cancers are increasing. There is  increase also in rectal and colon cancer.There is a continuous and constant increase in liver and gall bladder cancer in Mumbai. It is likely due to migrant population from north settling in Mumbai. Cervical cancer is decreasing as the hygiene is improving and parity is decreasing. In short we are transforming into a western pattern of incidence.

The worrying feature, however,  is the increase in mortality due to cancer. Stage to stage, more patients succumb in India than in other countries.

We have not made a significant dent overall in treatment. Its not that we don’t have facilities or expertise. We just continue to see patients in advanced stages.

I chaired a panel of experts.. The panel felt that prevention and early detection are the key. What is required is better diagnostic facilities for early detection

  • Creating awareness among people
  • Lifestyle modifications
  • Physician awareness and referal

These are not really difficult and if we concentrate on this perhaps we can start showing decrease as it is already happening in some of the countries in the West, in gastric, lung and cervical cancer.

More thoughts on these later.

 

 

 

‘Be aware’ of anaemia or Low hemoglobin

 

Jai is a regular donor to our Foundation. He is one of those who donates every year without asking. This time he came with a cheque earlier than ;usual and I asked him, “you normally would put in a cheque in March.” He said, “No, this is from my wife. Whenever she wins a kitty party she donates the whole amount to CACF. This is a remarkable way of using kitty money rather than on clothes or fancy things.

I asked Jai who is a businessman the sequence of events that led his coming for surgery. He is already 3 years post-surgery and doing well. Obviously he could detect the disease early and this is his story….

“I am part of the walking club and every morning I go walking for 60 min on Carter road but slowly I started becoming slightly breathless. My friends used to jokingly say that I am getting old and unable to keep up with them. I really could not keep pace with them. I started becoming breathless whilst walking up a flight of stairs too. Initially I thought its because of my heart but my ECG, everything was normal. I went to my general physician who ordered usual tests and to my utter surprise haemoglobin was just 8 gms against normal of 12 gms. So obviously I was feeling breathless because not enough oxygen was being carried by low haemoglobin. This started a series of investigations and fortunately my general physician got a scan done which showed mass in the colon and subsequently endoscopy confirmed Colon cancer and I came for surgery.”

This is a very important story and also brings out a valuable point on being aware of some of the signs and symptoms and taking necessary action on them.

Anaemia or low haemoglobin is one of the classical presentations of gastro-intestinal cancer and it should not be taken as lack of iron or nutrition or due to any other cause. Many times anaemia can be manifested by just tiredness, weakness and breathlessness. Once anaemia is detected it NECESSARY to have a sonography or scan done which can pick up any lesion. It is also good to test the stool for occult blood. If occult blood is positive in any of the 3 samples, colonoscopy or endoscopy are warranted. In this way we are can pick up GI cancers very early.

The best part about GI cancers is that when detected early they just need surgery and good surgery will ensure a long time survival. Most of them, nearly 90%, survive for 5-10 years. Even chemotherpy can be avoided.

So just be aware of these symptoms. The symptoms should not alarm you but should alert you for investigations.

Take care of your health.